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change your own tires

Virago Ninja - Wrenchin' Secrets & Help Tips! http://Virago.Ninja
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PostAuthor: paul j s » Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:23 pm

Make sure to use a good soappy water as a lube to aid in the removal of the tire(Fingerpick's C-clamp is a good idea and will work very well to break bead) and get a set of tire irons as they are going to help in putting the new tire on , cheap and wont damage the bead ,lube the new bead up and then put it on,as for the bead take your valve core out and hold the tire + wheel assemble uprite with the core at the bottom, you will be able to push the tire into the wheel where the bead has not sealed with just a little pressure , you might need a chair to sit on so you can hold the tire with both hands and maybe a foot or two, I never had to hold more then four points, once the bead jumps on put your valve core back in and check psi, with core out psi builds up fast

Yes I know this is an old post but it was on the home page and as I'm a Tire man that messed up his tire's on his first bike back in the 70's (when my job was going to school and mowing lawns) with screwdrivers and no lube
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PostAuthor: ss350z » Thu Apr 16, 2009 9:44 pm

After reading up and watching the YouTube video, I jumped right in a changed both tires on the 750.

I didn't need anything to break the bead, just let the air out and pushed on it. Most important part is to get some decent tire irons ( 3 ) and the soapy water.

It took maybe an hour to do each tire, but that included removing the tires for the first time too.

I did not balance the tires. We'll see how it goes and I can always balance later. :burnout:
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PostAuthor: PaulSwany » Thu Apr 16, 2009 11:05 pm

I did the same thing for my 920.... Took a little elbow grease, but I got 'em done... They ride great too!

Getting ready to do the tires on my son's bike Saturday.
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Re: change your own tires

PostAuthor: Busrydr » Fri Apr 17, 2009 12:19 pm

I bought the Harbor Freight changer for about 5 years. When I first tried to use it (without mounting it to the floor) I had all kinds of problems. It sat in the corner for years esentailly brand new. Then a friend showed me how to use it and I made it work for me. Once you get the hang of it it really works well.

But I have 4 bikes; one of them with chrome wheels and one with white wheels. I also change tires for some local riders. To avoid scratching the rims on other peoples bikes and my own I use to try and wrap the Harbor Freight changer with pieces of inner tubes and duck tape. Every now and then, I'd have an accident and put a ding in a rim.

Now I've upgraded to a No Mar tire changer. Same principal as the Harbor Freight tool but made to be easier and it will not scratch the rims.

For those DIYers, you can even improve the Harbor Freight tool by using some of the No Mar tire irons, bars and accessories. I did that for about 2 years before I upgraded to the No Mar Jr. Pro unit. For some the Harbor Freight tool will do just fine (and you have to mount it securely to a stable surface). But if you do more than the occasional change and take in a little fee for your labor, the No Mar is a welcomed addition to your DIY garage shop.

Most shops in my area charge over $120 for front and rear tire changes. And even the ones that tell you $10 more when you buy tires from them still get theirs due to them selling you tires at full suggested retail. I've paid for my No Mar in a riding season and taught guys how to take off their own wheels if they wanted to save some money.

But really, the tools they have will make life much easier even if you stay with the Harbor Freight set up.
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Re: change your own tires

PostAuthor: scratcher09 » Tue Mar 15, 2011 11:27 pm

I've always changed my own tires. To break the bead I use two large c-clamps and two pieces of 2X4. In the rare occasion that it doesn't work, I lay the wheel down on my driveway and lay a thick piece of plywood down on one edge of the tire so it does not touch the rim. then i SLOWLY drive my car over the plywood. Done carefully, it'll break any stubborn bead. And of course the soapy water helps get them back on.
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Re: change your own tires

PostAuthor: grnrngr » Fri Mar 18, 2011 11:31 pm

Always check the rotation arrow to make sure you put them on the right way, and there's a little dot on the sidewall, called the balance dot, that should be in line with the valve stem for balancing from the factory....
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Re: change your own tires - bead

PostAuthor: sjaficio » Sat Nov 10, 2012 9:01 pm

How about getting the bead back on properly? Was a bit of a struggle getting it all off and then the new tire and tube back on, but with all the tips and the youtube videos, finally managed it. However, parts of the tire won't seat properly, even with the tube fully inflated to spec. Glaring gaps between the tire and the rim. Any tips? Thanks.

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Re: change your own tires

PostAuthor: ms8238 » Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:13 am

shot of wd-40 [doesn't hurt rubber] soap and water, something to help it slip in place
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Re: change your own tires

PostAuthor: sjaficio » Mon Nov 12, 2012 1:51 am

Tried the WD40 and took the tire down to the gas station. That worked. Thanks.

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Re: change your own tires

PostAuthor: juro12 » Sun May 05, 2019 8:06 pm


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Re: change your own tires

PostAuthor: juro12 » Sun Jul 21, 2019 10:57 pm


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