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Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 1:57 pm
Author: turbodog
The spring selection process:
I found the 3 springs linked above on Amazon, searching by 1" OD. I made a spreadsheet looking at combinations of these, compared mostly to the specs for Progressive 11-1117.
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Then I removed the stock springs, and found they only measured 22 inches long. I expected them to be longer.
I added the last combo to the chart. I then tried it out, putting 1" fender washers between each spring. I had to compress the spring stack about 1 inch to get the fork cap on. I sent the unused springs back. Gotta love Amazon.

As you can see, I gave up a fair amount of travel, but the forks do not ever bottom out. I am not running any air pressure.

Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 12:06 am
Author: rantingsmith
That's very cool, thanks TD! I shall use this when I get mine on 3 wheels!

Cheers,

Rant.

Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 2:57 pm
Author: turbodog
The final fix for the remaining headshake was adding a better steering damper. I used the tried-and-true VW bug damper. Now handling and stability are stellar. The front header is not hanging in harm's way, and the look is cleaner.
New Subframe Completed
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Steering Damper
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Happy dog
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Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 11:54 pm
Author: rantingsmith
Hi TD,

Would you say relocating the front axle is a worthwhile mod?

I have swapped the tug forks from the 1st gen 750's to TR1s to get the double disc setup which has moved the axle from the front of the stanchions to the bottom of the stanchions if you see what I mean.. not sure what it has done to the trail tho'..?

I am slowly drawing up various plates for laser cutting required for the project and was wondering if I should include axle relocation plates or not..

I have looked at the exhaust through frame pics but can't figure out where it exits/connects to the rear exhaust.. would love some pics of that side, not that I'll be running mine that way, chair will be mounted on the left for the UK but I am curious as to how you done it..

Cheers,

Rant.

Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 6:31 am
Author: turbodog
I only drove a short distance with the forks in stock configuration. Steering effort was really high. It was marginal for me, and there is no way my wife could have driven it. If you are going to have parts cut, I would include the leading leg adapter pieces. Try it stock, but then you'll have the parts on hand when (not if!) you decide to make the modification. I don't think the 750 forks are sufficiently different from the XV920R to change my advice.

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The rear exits the big subframe tube via a 90 degree 'butt-weld' steel elbow. It is a slip-fit into the thin-wall tube inside the big tube. After this pic was taken, I added reinforcement where I cut open the big tube to allow the elbow to exit. The next bit I have no pics: the elbow is welded to a short (3 inch?) tube which enters the truncated collector box. It becomes a permanent part of the collector box assembly. To get it apart, I remove the front cyl header flange nuts, pull the front header pipe forward, loose from the elbow, then extract the left side muffler/collector box/elbow assembly from the left side.

The collector box is modified by cutting off the right side muffler and front cyl inlet pipe in a straight line. Then 1/8 inch steel is welded to cap off the opening. Then, after careful fitment checks with the assembly in the photo above, I cut a hole in the collector box for the inlet from the elbow using a plasma torch. Then assembled the whole thing, tack-welded the elbow to the collector box opening, then pulled it all apart and finished up the welding. The whole thing took a weekend.

The weak link is the slip-fit from the elbow to the thin wall pipe inside the subframe tube. Leakage is minimal because the slip fit is very close.... but after a few thousand miles, will I be able to get it back apart? Hopefully I will have no reason to try.

Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 7:29 pm
Author: turbodog
Just because.....
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Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 4:36 am
Author: Crazy_Russian
I completely forgot about this thread. awesome work man! congratulations and getting it all assembled and figured out.
And unfortunately I still haven't gotten a sidecar for my. School and other projects keep getting in a way. But I should have the old girl back and roadworthy in a few weeks)

Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2018 10:05 pm
Author: turbodog
Well, the 920 sidecar rig odometer continues to roll, with no problems to report. A solid, well-handling rig... stable and reassuring at 5 - 75 MPH. I will be changing the seat. The Euro-only '84 and up TR1 seat is not all that comfortable.

Otherwise, it runs great, and Ryder gets tons of smiles and waves as we go. Here's a pic taken by the staff at the place I take him for 'doggy day care'.
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Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2018 12:39 pm
Author: turbodog
I took the pic above and am making it into a tshirt. Sort of a statement of fact, but also a philosophy of life:

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Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2018 2:53 pm
Author: nanno
Get one of the earlier seats (and rear subframes) - much comfier!

Sidecar looks absolutely great!

Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2018 6:32 pm
Author: turbodog
Thanks for the kind words, CR and Greg. You would not believe the cost and effort to get that euro seat to Texas. But, sadly, it is not comfy. I have a lightly used Sargent saddle i plan to adapt onto it.

Re: Turbodog's Sidecar Project

PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2019 9:11 am
Author: turbodog
Several 1000's more miles, and one sidecar tire since my last update. 2 weeks ago, I adjusted the valve clearances and (tried to) sync the carbs. The linkage is just plain worn out. Even after disassembly, slight modification to extend the adjustment range, and lubing... still crappy.

So, back to a single carb for me. I originally had this rig set up with a brand new KJS manifold and HS40. It seemed to run fine as-received, but the air cleaner interfered with my wife's knee (we're the same height, but her inseam is 6 inches longer!). That's when I collected parts to resurrect a stock twin carb setup.

In order to optimize my odds of quick success (the dog is getting impatient), I got 3 carb options ready to go:
1. the HS40. Should bolt on and run, but needs a different air filter option.

2. A Keihin CV40, like I ran on the bike (same engine and final drive is now my sidecar tug) in this long-forgotten thread:
viewtopic.php?f=61&t=21047

The original Keihin cracked at the fuel inlet, so I ordered a brand-new Chinese knock off for $180. Swapped the jets over from the retired Keihin.

3. An original Hitachi, cannibalized from the dual carb setup, with jets from the carb I ran in the bike linked above after the Keihin died.

I first bolted on the HS40. It did not run well, but it was due to a vacuum leak. I took a shortcut and re-used the gaskets that were on the manifold. Bad idea.

In the meantime, the Keihin knock-off arrived, so I re-did the KJS installation properly, swapped jets, and tried the CV40. Ran great.

On to the air filter issue. I ended up making a 90 degree elbow out of 2 inch PVC and using the K&N cone filter I ran back in the day:

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I've run a tank of gas through this, and am happy so far. The bike pulls much harder with both cylinders working equally. It will sneeze thru the carb if I try to go without a minute of warm-up (or a touch of choke). But after that minute or two, it has very good manners.

I should also add that I found I had not recorded all my jetting info anywhere except in this forum... I was really bummed when I tried to log in to get it and the forum was down. Matt, let us know what we can do to help.