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Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

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Re: Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

PostAuthor: CX Rancher » Tue Jul 28, 2015 4:04 pm

gleam wrote:I think this one is really important....I'm actively watching the car's wheels (not the driver) for the first indication of motion so that I can react as soon as possible. I consider this setup to be a direct threat, and I treat it that way until I'm past it.

I've had people tell me that they've had occasions where drivers have sat there waiting in that setup, made eye contact with them, and then still turn left in front of them. I'm sure 'turning left in front of motorcycle' or something like that would bring up a lot of Googles. It's a well known phenomenon it seems.

:yup:
Amen Amen... learned that in the '80's inner city...full dress SilverWing and they can look completely through you.
...and then drive completely through you.

Watch the Wheels not their eyes.
G'Luk !
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Re: Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

PostAuthor: cat3 » Tue Jul 28, 2015 7:48 pm

:yup:

I also give them a blast from the horn if I see so much as a twitch in the wheel.
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Re: Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

PostAuthor: Bildak » Sun Feb 28, 2016 12:35 pm

Jake wrote:
jtsil wrote:
Also I was using a snickers and my feet seems to start to get hot from the engine,


What were you using the Snickers for ? Candy bars and motorcycles hmmmmmm.....must be something new :bg:

1st, ride like you're invisible NOT INVINCIBLE like those idiots on crotch rockets !

When following another vehicle stay far enough behind and close enough to the left hand side of your lane so that the driver in the car in front of you can see you in both rear view and side view mirrors. That position also grants you the best view of oncoming traffic and provides a better chance of them seeing you ( still keeping with the invisible factor ).

Take in the big picture when you're riding, don't just focus on what's in front of you but your entire surroundings, always look for a way out.

When riding with others, ride in a staggered formation. If you want someone riding beside you, use a car.

NEVER... NEVER... NEVER TRUST ANYONE MAKING A LEFT TURN ACROSS YOUR DIRECTION OF TRAVEL !!!!

One thing of great importance to me at least, be at a heightened sense of alertness when riding into the sun, you are blinded by the sun and people WILL pull out in front of you !!!! When that happens you see how invisible you are and pray that at that particular moment you are invincible !!

Those driving behind you will also NOT see you, they will be blinded and add that to your invisibility.

Those that will pull out in front of you may see you coming and pull out anyway, due to the smaller size of a motorcycle whereas that would not do the same if you were driving a semi, size does matter ! They don't see the motorcycle as a danger to their safety but a semi they will.

The best piece of safety equipment you will ever own is on your shoulders, keep it focused, and don't lose it. Don't ride angry, upset or distracted.


Great Advice, but would like to add that when at a stop light and you are the lead vehicle, delay a second or two when that light turns green. That allows for the idiot running the red light to go past you without T-boning you. Keeps you safer, I know. Happened to me. I waited that 1 -2 seconds before starting to move into the intersection where a driver did run the red light and would of hit me broadside.

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Re: Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

PostAuthor: wkdenton » Sun Feb 28, 2016 5:35 pm

mototom wrote:Take a safety course sponsored by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, MSF, if you can. In some states, they are virtually free because other organizations also sponsor them.
They will cover a lot of the techniques people have spoken about above, and you'll get instructor assistance while on a bike on a closed course. That's a lot better than trying to take someone's words here and hope you get it right on the road

^^
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Re: Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

PostAuthor: gregkw1 » Tue Mar 01, 2016 1:40 am

I try usually not to take the highway but when I do I like to stay ahead of everybody if I have to do 75 or 80 or 85 I like going past people I don't like people passing me that's why I'm a firm believer in the 1100 and a bike that goes like a bat out of hell
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Re: Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

PostAuthor: landcrab » Tue Mar 01, 2016 9:05 pm

I too am a firm believer in the 1100 bat outa hell. I will squirt between two stable drivers to avoid a cell talker/texter. I listen to ABATE instructors, (once every three years for a reminder) talk about how loud pipes are only heard behind you but I disagree. I drive a truck as well and hear the harley coming up behind me but not the R1. I try to be all over the place so everyone in the cluster becomes aware of my presence and my Nasty MACs help a lot. No road frightens me more than US285 "Turkey Creek Canyon" it is a commuter 4 lane with a bad/reverse crown full of tight curves and a 45mph speed limit that is completely ignored. Coming down that canyon with a lifted Ford on your butt will give you palpatations. I avoid the super slabs through the city (Denver) cause that is where the real nuts live and riders die from multiple contact.
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Re: Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

PostAuthor: gregkw1 » Wed Mar 02, 2016 12:22 am

When I bought the bike you see below I flew up to Buffalo New York from Gainesville Florida got the bike Road 1200 miles in 30 hours all highway all doing just about 80-85 miles an hour and the whole way down I don't think one car or truck ever passed me...now that is serious highway riding.
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Re: Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

PostAuthor: cat3 » Wed Mar 02, 2016 10:26 am

gleam wrote:
o c t o r wrote:same situation . . . get to the farthest part o-v the lane when going in front o-v them.
same again . . . I always have my 2 brakes ready to Jam


I think this one is really important. A person in the other lane heading the opposite direction as you, stopped and waiting to turn to their left, is the most dangerous thing. I'm constantly scanning to the point where it's almost just background processing mentally. I always watch for this situation developing. I've never tried swerving, but I have flicked my high beams once or twice to make sure they see me if it seems like they might not.

When I see that setup, I go to the far right of my lane, like octor said, to give me another split second to react. This was in a bike training something or other I read or watched. I also watch them and fully expect them to turn into me until I'm past them. I'm not relaxed and passively rolling by. I'm actively watching the car's wheels (not the driver) for the first indication of motion so that I can react as soon as possible. I consider this setup to be a direct threat, and I treat it that way until I'm past it.

I've had people tell me that they've had occasions where drivers have sat there waiting in that setup, made eye contact with them, and then still turn left in front of them. I'm sure 'turning left in front of motorcycle' or something like that would bring up a lot of Googles. It's a well known phenomenon it seems.


:yup:

I can't stress this enough. In my job as a trial/litigation consultant to lawyers, I see a great many cases of motorcycle accidents, and an enormous percentage of them arise from this situation. It's the equivalent of a "Killing Zone" for motorcycles.

I leave my headlights on low normally, and flick them to high AND LEAVE THEM ON HIGH as I roll through the intersection, as far right of the left turner, and as slow as practical. The instant I see those front wheels move, I lay on the horn. Yeah, I get the finger alot, but it's a small price to pay. The reason to not flick back to low beam is to avoid the left-turner from interpreting it as a "go ahead" signal.

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Re: Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

PostAuthor: turnrightonred » Wed Mar 02, 2016 1:27 pm

cat3 wrote: ...
I leave my headlights on low normally, and flick them to high AND LEAVE THEM ON HIGH as I roll through the intersection, as far right of the left turner, and as slow as practical. The instant I see those front wheels move, I lay on the horn. Yeah, I get the finger alot, but it's a small price to pay. The reason to not flick back to low beam is to avoid the left-turner from interpreting it as a "go ahead" signal...

I don't use my lights at all in this situation for two reasons. 1) I tried the "flash high and low" technique once and the driver did interpret it as a signal I was yielding the right of way. 2) Running with high beams, like loud pipes doesn't make a motorcyclist safer or make him a Badass, it just pisses other drivers off. It can get much more serious than "the finger."

The best defense when approaching an intersection is to SLOW DOWN!

I hear so often that automobile drivers are "out to kill motorcyclists." This is seldom (but not always) the case. I saw a YouTube clip where a driver deliberately sideswiped a motorcyclist (with a passenger) and then when he stopped said "I don't care." He later claimed a wasp had stung him. I hope that guy was charged with attempted vehicular homicide! Fortunately, that type of lowlife is rare, in my experience. My attitude is that, my life is my own to protect and I have several rules to help me accomplish that goal.

1) When I ride, I am stone cold sober... no exceptions!
2) I have a long talk with myself at the beginning of each and every ride. Motorcycle riding is an incredibly dangerous activity and the possibility for death or serious injury exists for every mile.
3) I look down the road, through the windshields of cars in front of me if necessary while maintaining a two second interval.
4) Whenever I see traffic slowing or see brake lights, I immediately look into the rear view mirrors, increase my interval and flash my brake light several times.
5) I do a head check with every single lane change. 5 lanes from the "chute" to the HOV lane? Signal on, head check, mirror check, lane change, signal off... repeat 4 more times. I say "head" check but it really more of a "head and shoulders" check.
6) I NEVER show off... EVER. I saw a guy at the "Two Wheel Only" campground in Suches, Georgia attempt a wheelie on a big Honda sport bike once. He slid off of the seat and his hand rolled the throttle wide open. He tried to keep up with the motorcycle on foot until it ran away and he did the "Superman" thing, sliding along on his palms. The amount of blood that poured from his palms is best described as something from a horror movie! The motorcycle fell on its side and the crankcase shattered.
7) I always "dress for the fall." That means' my beloved riding gear: Bell 3/4 helmet, Alpinestars boots, Bates gloves, Levi's blue jeans, and my Fox Creek leather jacket... LOVE my Fox Creek jacket!
:cl:
8) I alone am responsible for my safety. No recriminations, no blame, no anger. If I am injured by another driver, it's because I failed to do something that would have prevented my injury. This is hard to accept for some because it's often accepted as dogma that "they" were wrong and the poor, poor innocent motorcyclist paid the price.

So what, if the driver in front of me, merging into 5 lanes of heavy, high speed traffic sweeping around a curve (into a lane that is "exit only" in 1/4 mile) loses his nerve at the last minute and stands on his brake?
So what - if I have set up with plenty of room in front and I'm cranking the throttle wide open in third riding a motorcycle with 110 HP with its "VBOOST" dumping fuel into its four cylinders?
So what - If I'm already moving at 70MPH (the speed of traffic) and getting ready to shift?
So what - if I'm beginning to divide my attention into the rear view mirror and head (and shoulders) checks, so I can keep track of any cars trying to merge into the exit lane?
So what - If I also have to pick up the aggressive driver coming from two lanes over to pass traffic in the merge/ exit lane?
So what - if I now have the absolute minimum amount of time and space to transition from wide open throttle to throttle chop, clutch-in and "balls to the wall" braking?
My life depends on MY skill... MY skill. Who was at fault when I am lying under the engine of that car and on top of its roof at the same time, isn't important but; You know what? I probably will be assumed to be at fault for "following too closely!"

You guys who live in countries that travel on the left side of the road, must convert the below discussion into its mirror image.

Re the approaching car turning left across my path or the driver waiting at the intersection preparing to turn right and occupy my lane: This is a very easy scenario to understand and it most often has nothing to do with the other driver's attention or any malice he might have.

My analysis of the situation is that other driver isn't ignoring me because he DOESN'T SEE ME! Yeah, he looked right at me but his brain didn't register my presence because he's not looking for a vehicle in the way. He's looking for something else entirely. HE IS LOOKING FOR A SPACE!

HE IS LOOKING FOR A SPACE - in the traffic - that he can occupy.

With the left turn across my lane, he is looking to the curb side of the lane he is preparing to cross and if I am tucked close to the centerline his brain registers "A SPACE." I occupy a position closer to the curb in this situation.

With the right turn into the lane I am occupying to begin travelling in the same direction, he is looking toward the centerline and if I am tucked close to the curb, his brain again registers, "A SPACE." I occupy a position closer to the centerline in this situation.

So what happens if I encounter these two situations together. It does happen. First and foremost, slow down! Separate the hazards; which one will I have to deal with first? Then S.I.P.D.E.

Octor has related how he weaves from side to side when approaching an intersection. This is an excellent technique and does register to other drivers as "not clear... wait."

I think spinning hubcaps should be outlawed!
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Re: Any Highway tips for a New Rider ?

PostAuthor: Tommy P. » Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:50 pm

I rode for 25 years but gave it up in the mid-90's. Now I am getting back into it. I have been thru MSF courses twice and since that was in the 70's I am contemplating going thru again. In the meantime I am watching a LOT of videos on u-tube on motorcycle safety. Some really good ones out there and there is one guy who posts a new one every week.
I survived Southern California traffic back in the 70's and 80's by practicing situational awareness. When you first start this or think about it, one would think it would detract from the motorcycling experience. It doesn't take very long to not even be aware that you are doing it as it becomes second nature. MSF teaches this, or used to.
There have been very good posts above this one that all bring out good points. My advice for any new rider is take a MSF course and practice what they will teach you. Know your limits! A San Diego motor officer at the second MSF course I took put it this way " the motorcycle is the master; as soon as you think you have mastered the bike, it will teach you different." He also cautioned us that sooner or later we all take a spill. He was so right, I went down twice, minor injuries both times except for my pride. I had thought I was in charge of the bike and it showed me different. Luckily both times was in town, slow speed.
Ride safe and come home every time!
Tom

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